Today’s English word of the day is: avenue. Keep reading to learn the meaning of ‘avenue’, hear the pronunciation, and read two examples of the vocabulary in use. With each English word of the day, I only focus on one definition. To see every meaning of the word, check out its entry in the Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries or in the Merriam-Webster Learner’s Dictionary.

 

Word of the Day: AVENUE (Next Step English)

 

avenue: a wide, straight road with trees on both sides, especially one leading to a big house

 

American English Pronunciation: /ˈævənuː/

 

 

🥰: Williamsburg is beautiful in the fall. Leaves ride the breeze around you as you stroll down the avenue towards the Governor’s Palace.

 

🙂: You know, I’ve lived in Virginia my whole life, and I’ve still never been there! I should go this October, once the leaves change.

 

 

 

🧐: The avenue leading up to Grantleigh Manor is riddled with potholes! Are we paupers now, that we can’t have this fixed?!

 

😬: Actually, ma’am, you are rather in the red. I’ve been holding off the bank for months.

 

 

Want more practice using the word ‘avenue’? Here are some BBC.com articles featuring today’s word of the day!

 

And just for fun… Here’s an old classic from Judy Garland and Fred Astaire from the movie Easter Parade. Can you hear when she mentions today’s word of the day?

“On the avenue, Fifth Avenue,
The photographers will snap us,
And you’ll find that you’re in the rotogravure.
Oh, I could write a sonnet about your Easter bonnet,
And of the guy I’m taking to the Easter parade!”

 

Not sure how you’re going to remember this advanced English word? Here are my top 10 tips for how to remember hard vocabulary words! 👊🙂

 

Itching for more English? Check out my seven reasons why you should be learning English through music.

 

 

 

Definition source: Oxford Learner’s Dictionaries.

Come back tomorrow for another advanced English word of the day! My schedule is:

MONDAY: noun
TUESDAY: verb
WEDNESDAY: adjective
THURSDAY: slang, idiom, or phrasal verb
FRIDAY: academic, literary, or otherwise “big” vocabulary

 

Related Post

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This